because we all need to dream a little
With Hidden Noise by Marcel Duchamp,1916. Readymade sculpture of brass, string and unknown object. Philadelphia Museum of Art, The Louise and Walter Arensberg Collection.

Jen Graves wrote in The Stranger:


  On Easter Day in 1916, the artist Marcel Duchamp—the man who invented the readymade (or is “invented” the right word?)—gave his friend Walter Arensberg a ball of nautical twine and asked Arensberg to insert an object into the center of the ball. Duchamp asked Arensberg not to tell him what was in the center of his own artwork. He sandwiched the ball between two brass plates held together by four screws, and titled the sculpture With Hidden Noise because when you shake it, the secret contents make a rattling sound.


Read the rest on The Stranger.

I am posting a Duchamp today because Scott Kindall created a a web-based program that will compete with YOU in a chess match as if you were playing against Master Duchamp himself. Kindall writes on Playing Duchamp:


  Based on 72 recorded tournament games by played by Marcel Duchamp in the 1920s and 1930s alongside conversations with Jennifer Shahade, a chess and Duchamp expert, I abstracted various principles regarding his chess strategies. From this knowledge, I modified the GNU Chess code, under GPL license.


I played him and lost in 24 moves. I think I might have done better if I didn’t mix up which was my king and which was the queen. PROTIP: The queen is the one with the crown.

With Hidden Noise by Marcel Duchamp,1916. Readymade sculpture of brass, string and unknown object. Philadelphia Museum of Art, The Louise and Walter Arensberg Collection.

Jen Graves wrote in The Stranger:

On Easter Day in 1916, the artist Marcel Duchamp—the man who invented the readymade (or is “invented” the right word?)—gave his friend Walter Arensberg a ball of nautical twine and asked Arensberg to insert an object into the center of the ball. Duchamp asked Arensberg not to tell him what was in the center of his own artwork. He sandwiched the ball between two brass plates held together by four screws, and titled the sculpture With Hidden Noise because when you shake it, the secret contents make a rattling sound.

Read the rest on The Stranger.

I am posting a Duchamp today because Scott Kindall created a a web-based program that will compete with YOU in a chess match as if you were playing against Master Duchamp himself. Kindall writes on Playing Duchamp:

Based on 72 recorded tournament games by played by Marcel Duchamp in the 1920s and 1930s alongside conversations with Jennifer Shahade, a chess and Duchamp expert, I abstracted various principles regarding his chess strategies. From this knowledge, I modified the GNU Chess code, under GPL license.

I played him and lost in 24 moves. I think I might have done better if I didn’t mix up which was my king and which was the queen. PROTIP: The queen is the one with the crown.